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PAID 112 Section 22 - Bodensteiner (Spring 2021)

Find resources and search tips for your Paideia 112 research paper on storytelling and narratives

In This Section

in this sectionIn this section you'll find:

  • Information on different types of sources that you might use, including:
    • Academic journals
    • Newspapers
    • Magazines
  • Things to consider as you evaluate your sources

Academic Journal

Also known as scholarly, refereed, or peer-reviewed journals.

Appearance: Generally have a sober, serious look. May contain graphs and charts, but few glossy pages or photographs. Uses scholarly language with vocabulary specific to their profession or field.

Audience: Written for academics and professionals.

Author/Authority: Articles written by researchers or scholars in the field who report the results of original research.

Citations: Articles include footnotes and a list of citations at the end of the article.

Content: Includes scholarly research for a particular profession or industry.

Frequency: Usually published bimonthly or quarterly.

Examples:

         

Newspapers

Appearance: Generally printed on newsprint in black ink.

Audience: Written for the general public.

Author/Authority: Articles written by staff writers and freelance journalists.

Citations: Will sometimes cite sources, a scholar, or a freelance writer.

Content: Includes current events and special features.

Frequency: Usually published daily or weekly.

Examples:

    

General Interest Magazine

Appearance: Generally attractive and illustrated with color photographs.

Audience: Written for the general public.

Author/Authority: Articles written by staff or freelance writer.

Citations: Rarely includes citations or references to other sources.

Content: Includes current events and special features.

Frequency: Usually published weekly or monthly.

Examples:

         

Choosing Sources

evaluate sourcesWhen choosing sources, consider:

  • Who
    • Who wrote it? What could their biases and affiliations be?
  • What
    • What kind of source is it? A book? A newspaper article?
    • What claims does the source make? What is its argument or thesis?
  • Where
    • Where was it published? In an encyclopedia? Online? What country?
  • When
    • When was it written? What time frame does it cover?
  • Why
    • Why did the author write it?
    • Why might it be useful to my own argument or research questions?
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